Tag Archive TowerJazz

ByAdele Hars

TowerJazz Ramps 300mm 65nm RF-SOI, extends long-term partnership with Soitec

Specialty foundry TowerJazz is ramping a 65nm version of its RF-SOI process on 300mm wafers at Fab 7 in Uozu, Japan. To support the ramp, the company has signed a contract with long-term partner, Soitec, guaranteeing a supply of tens of thousands of 300mm SOI silicon wafers, securing wafer prices for the next years and ensuring supply to its customers, despite a tight SOI wafer market.

The 300mm 65nm RF-SOI process will be offered at the Uozu, Japan fab, which is operated by the TowerJazz Panasonic Semiconductor Company (TPSCo). (Photo courtesy: TowerJazz)

Five of TJ’s seven fabs do RF-SOI. LNA (low-noise amplifers) are a big market driver, and with RF-SOI they can integrate the LNA with the switch, CEO Russell Ellwanter said in his lead keynote at the SOI Consortium’s 5th International RF-SOI Workshop in Shanghai (spring, 2018). BTW, that was in fact a very inspirational talk about Value Creation, and the importance of treating your suppliers with respect. He credited his company’s close relationship with RF-SOI wafer-supplier Soitec for TJ’s claim to the world’s best linearity.

“We are delighted to see the strong adoption of 300mm RF SOI through this large capacity and supply agreement with TowerJazz to augment our already significant 200mm RF-SOI partnership,” said Soitec CEO Paul Boudre. “TowerJazz was the first foundry to ramp our RFeSI products to high volume production in 200mm and continues as one of the industry leaders in innovation in this exciting RF market with advanced and differentiated offerings.”

According to the TJ press release (you can read it here), with its best in class metrics the TowerJazz 65nm RF-SOI process enables the combination of low insertion loss and high power handling RF switches with options for high-performance low-noise amplifiers as well as digital integration. The process can reduce losses in an RF switch improving battery life and boosting data rates in handsets and IoT terminals.

It’s a high-growth market, to be sure. Market researchers Mobile Experts predict that the mobile RF front-end market will reach $22 billion in 2022 from an estimated $16 billion in 2018. TowerJazz says its breakthrough RF SOI technology continues to support this high-growth market and is well-poised to take advantage of next-generation 5G standards, which will boost data rates and provide further content growth opportunities in the coming years.

Customers are already getting into position. For example, Maxscend (WuXi, China), a provider of RF components and IoT integrated circuits, is ramping in this new technology. “We chose TowerJazz for its advanced technology capabilities and its ability to deliver in high volume while continuously innovating with a strong roadmap. We specifically selected its 300mm 65nm RF SOI platform for our next-generation product line due to its superior performance, enabling low insertion loss and high power handling,” said Maxscend CEO Zhihan Xu.

As longtime ASN readers will know, we’ve been covering the evolutions of TJ’s RF-SOI platforms since the beginning of the decade. It’s worth noting, too, that beyond RF, TowerJazz also offers foundry customers other SOI-based processes, such as the new 0.18μm BCD SOI, a 200V SOI technology platform (announced in 2017, press release here) for motor drivers, industrial tools, electric vehicles and more. The previous generation 0.18μm SOI for automotive power management also offers exceptional area savings and is well-suited for high temperature operation. Back in 2014, here at ASN we did a great interview with TJ SVP Dr. Marco Racanelli about when and why they use SOI – and while processes have advanced, the basic drivers are still there, so it’s a still a good read.

And finally, designers will want to know that the TJ Multi-Project Wafer (MPW) Shuttle Program offers the 65nm RF-SOI process, as well as other SOI-based processes. See the website for scheduling and details.

ByAdele Hars

Foundries Expand Rapidly to Meet Soaring RF-SOI Demand (SemiEngineering)

“GlobalFoundries, TowerJazz, TSMC and UMC are expanding or bringing up RF SOI processes in 300mm fabs in an apparent race to garner the first wave of RF business for 5G, the next-generation wireless standard,” writes Mark Lapedus of Semiconductor Engineering. His recent piece, RF-SOI Wars Begin, explains why demand across the supply chain is currently tight.

Rest assured, the supply situation is being addressed fast. By next year, 300mm-based RF-SOI manufacturing (vs. 200mm) will increase from 5% to 20%. But with insatiable end-user demand for greater throughput, overall RF-SOI device demand is increasing in the double-digit range, so 200mm-based manufacturing is also expanding fast.

The front-end modules in all smartphones are built on Soitec’s RF-SOI wafer technology. The most advanced, for LTE/LTE-A, are built on Soitec’s RFeSI-SOI wafers, which have four layers to meet the demands of devices with high linearity requirements. (Courtesy: Soitec)

SOI wafer manufacturer Soitec has 70% of the RF-SOI wafer market share. The other RF-SOI wafer manufacturers – Shin-Etsu, GlobalWafers and Simgui – all use Soitec’s RF-SOI wafer manufacturing technology.

This is an excellent, comprehensive piece, that clearly explains the complexities of the markets, the devices, the manufacturing and the supply chain. It’s a highly recommended read.

BTW, the SOI Consortium is organizing a 4G/5G SOI supply chain workshop during Semicon West (July ’18). Sign up or get more information on that under the Events tab here on the consortium website.

Of course, here at ASN, we’ve been covering RF-SOI for over a decade. You can use our RF-SOI tag to access most of the pieces we’ve done over the years.

ByAdministrator

RF-SOI – Foundries Weigh In On New 300mm Wafers for 4G/LTE-A, 5G and IoT. Plus a Look at the Innovation Pipeline – Part 2 of 2

As you may have read in the first part of this series, Soitec (the industry’s leading supplier of SOI wafers) says its 200mm RF-SOI wafers have been used to produce over 20 billion chips, and the company is now in high-volume manufacturing of a 300mm version of its wildly successful RFeSI line (see press release here).

So far it’s been all about RF front-end module – aka FEM – chips that handle the back-and-forth of signals between the transceiver and the antenna, originally in 2G and 3G phones. For 4G/LTE-A (and 5G when that hits), there were new wafer innovations – and now 300mm wafers.

The newest RF-SOI wafers, Soitec’s RFeSI90 series (available in both 200mm and 300mm diameters), offer higher levels of performance such as better uniformity, which chip designers need to achieve greater control of transistor matching in analog designs. Plus with the new wafers designers can use thinner transistors and additional process options to improve RonCoff performance, the figure of merit that’s used to rate the performance of an RF switch. For Soitec customers (and really, anyone doing FEMs these days is a customer), all these advances plus the large supply of 200mm and 300mm wafers means that they can expand their production capacities for RF-SOI devices and produce more highly integrated ICs.

GlobalFoundries, for example, sang the praises of 300mm wafers for RF-SOI at a recent SOI Consortium forum in Tokyo. Here’s a slide from Peter Rabbeni’s talk, (he’s GloFo’s Sr. Director RF Product Marketing and Biz Dev), RFSOI: Defining the RF-Digital Boundary for 5G (you can get the full presentation here):

GloFo_RFSOI_300mm_Tokyo2016_slide24

Courtesy: SOI Consortium and GlobalFoundries

As you see in the slide above, RF-SOI champion Peregrine Semiconductor introduced the industry’s first 300mm RF-SOI technology – that was back in July 2015. Dubbed UltraCMOS® 11, it’s built on GlobalFoundries’ 130 nm 300mm RF technology platform (read about it here).

Looking forward, GF’s Rabbeni noted, “Significant R&D has been done in evaluating the application of SOI to 5G architectures, with very positive results. SOI holds great promise in delivering on the key requirements of 5G systems.”

TowerJazzPanasonic_RFSOI_300mm14

Courtesy: SOI Consortium and TPSCo

Also at the Tokyo event, Kenji Tateiwa, General Manager of R&D Strategic Planning for TPSCo (that’s TowerJazz/Panasonic), gave a great presentation on 300mm RFSOI Development toward IoT Era. 300mm RF-SOI, he noted, “has room to run.”

European Program Pushes Innovation Pipeline

For Soitec, of course, work on future generations of RF-SOI substrates continues unabated. You can be sure they’ve got a product roadmap focused on continued innovation and cost effectiveness for future mobile communication markets.

But in addition to working on its RF-SOI roadmap internally, Soitec is leading an international program to further develop the technology in collaboration with 16 partners from five European countries, representing the entire electronics value chain from raw materials to finished communication products. The REFERENCE Project, awarded in a call for projects by the Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership (ECSEL) group ─ aims to create a European competitive industrial ecosystem based on RF-SOI.

Over the next three years, the REFERENCE Project expects to innovate new materials, engineered substrates, processes, design, metrology and system integration that pave the way for 5G wireless communications. The R&D and demonstration objectives for 4G+/5G technologies include Soitec’s development of RF-SOI substrates, and the production of RF-SOI devices at two major European semiconductor foundries. These advances will contribute to RF-SOI’s growing use in three targeted applications: cellular communications/the Internet of Things (IoT), automotive and aeronautics , including pioneering new frequency bands.

Soitec is at the forefront of European innovation and we are very happy to be part of this very important European research project involving key partners beyond our direct customers,” said Nelly Kernevez, partnership director at Soitec. “This initiative allows us to build the European Union’s RF community, consolidate our vision of what the future can be, and leverage proven material technology to create RF communication solutions for tomorrow.”

The wireless world will keep progressing by leaps and bounds over the next few years. And it’s looking like ever-advancing RF-SOI substrates will be the springboard. Stay tuned!

ByGianni PRATA

China Design Conference (April 2016) Adds RF-SOI Design Track

EdiCon16EDI CON China 2016, taking place April 19-21 in Beijing at the China National Convention Center (CNCC) will feature a keynote talk by GlobalFoundries‘ Peter Rabbeni, Sr. Director, RF BU Business Development & Product Marketing. The talk, entitled, “RF SOI: Revolutionizing Radio Design Today and Driving Innovation for Tomorrow”, will kick off the newly added RF-SOI Technology Track. The SOI Track will also feature talks and workshops from Peregrine Semiconductor, TowerJazz, Simgui, AnalogSmith and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The talks will cover substrate engineering, design enablement, CMOS power amplifier design techniques and highly integrated control devices.

Mr. Rabbeni’s keynote talk will cover how there has been dramatic growth in RF SOI over the last several years in its continued march in driving performance improvement, cost reduction and architecture innovation between the transceiver and the antenna in mobile radios. No other radio technology in recent memory has had the impact that RF SOI has had in this respect. With standards becoming increasingly more challenging and the pending introduction of 5G, RF SOI is expected to continue to play an important role in the development of innovative architectures. His presentation will explore where we have been, why and where we may be headed with this technology. Substrate engineering and SOI device technology is reviewed in detail in Microwave Journal’s October 2015 cover story at http://www.microwavejournal.com/articles/25255.

More information is available at www.ediconchina.com.

ByGianni PRATA

TowerJazz Cites Strong RF-SOI Growth as Driving force in TX Fab Acquisition

TowerJazz-Maxim-Fab

Citing strong RF-SOI demand, TowerJazz has signed an agreement to purchase Maxim’s 8-inch fab in San Antonio, Texas (shown here).

With the acquisition of Maxim’s 8-inch fab in San Antonio, Texas, TowerJazz plans to quickly qualify its core specialty technologies, including its advanced Radio-Frequency Silicon-on-Insulator (RF-SOI) offering, to serve the substantial growth in demand from its customers. (See press release here.)

The proposed purchase will expand TowerJazz’s current worldwide manufacturing capacity, cost-effectively increasing production by approximately 28,000 wafers per month. The availability of additional capacity is expected to be needed to serve TowerJazz’s current and forecasted robust customer demand. TowerJazz and Maxim expect to close the transaction in January 2016, subject to customary closing conditions.

ByAdministrator

RF-SOI vs. FD-SOI with RF – What’s the difference?

Is RF-SOI the same thing as RF on FD-SOI? No, it’s not. However, the runaway success of RF-SOI and the growing list of recent announcements related to FD-SOI with integrated RF has lead to some confusion in the press and social media. The two are different technologies, addressing different markets, and built on two very different types of SOI wafers. The use of one technology or the other depends on the requirements of the targeted RF application.

For the non-technical reader, here is a bit of basic background. At the most simplistic level – RF: radio frequency – is part of the analog family, and as such is all about waves. And when you talk about waves, you talk about losses over distance (attenuation), speed, wavelength and frequency – which is why the RF design has a rep of being something of a black art. The distance to cover, the power envelope and the amount of data to carry over that distance (and of course, the cost) determine the chip solutions. An important part of the RF chip solution is the choice of the wafer substrate itself.

So here’s a quick primer to help sort out what’s what. Please bear in mind, though, that this is a fast-evolving world, so what you’re about to read is not a definitive and forever what’s what – but more of a general (and simplified) “this is how it is currently shaking out”.

RF-SOI – Talk to the Tower

When it comes to using your mobile device for data transmission over a 2G, 3G, 4G/LTE/LTE-A (and next, 5G) network, you still need dedicated RF front-end modules (FEMs). FEMs handle the back-and-forth of signals between the transceiver and the antenna. They contain multiple parts, including switches, power amplifiers, antenna tuning, power management and filters. Traditionally, they were built on gallium arsenide substrates. But more and more, the multiple chips in FEM chipsets are being reduced to single SOCs built on a special class of high-resistivity SOI wafers. This is the realm of RF-SOI. The wafers for RF-SOI are designed specifically to handle the special needs of getting a lot of data transmitted wirelessly, often over relatively long distances.

eSI_SoitecUCLwafer

Soitec premiered a radically new and immensely successful generation of RF-SOI substrates in 2013: the enhanced Signal Integrity™(eSI) family, which introduced the concept of the “trap-rich” layer developed at UCL. (Image courtesy of Soitec)

The latest standards (LTE-A and 5G) raise the stakes ever higher, requiring mobile devices to support more bands, higher frequency bands, and emission and reception on adjacent bands with downlink and uplink carrier aggregation. (Carrier aggregation refers to the simultaneous reception of multiple frequency bands to improve data throughput.)

For RF designers, that means choosing substrates that favor low RF loss and high RF linearity. A couple of years ago, SOI leader Soitec, in partnership with UCL, brought breakthrough RF-SOI wafer technology to the market (read about that here). Now, a few generations later, Soitec estimates that one billion RF devices are produced each quarter using their advanced and enhanced Signal Integrity™(eSI)wafers for RF. In fact it would be nigh near impossible to find a smartphone that doesn’t have an RF FEM based on  RF-SOI wafer technology.

Here at ASN, we’ve covered many of the leaders in RF-SOI FEMs over the last few years. Click on any of these names to get an idea of what they’re doing: IBM (now part of GlobalFoundries), Peregrine, SkyWorks, TowerJazz, ST, Qorvo, Sony, Qualcomm, Grace, Toshiba and MagnaChip. To learn more about the latest developments in wafer technology for RF-SOI, click here. With demand soaring, Soitec’s most advanced RF-SOI wafers are now also being produced by Simgui in China – read about that here.

In fact, the cover story and technical features of the October 2015 issue of the prestigious Microwave Journal is dedicated to RF-SOI – click here to read it.

So in terms of terminology, that’s “RF-SOI”. Now let’s look at how RF on FD-SOI is different.

RF in FD-SOI – for digital integration

When we talk about RF in FD-SOI, we’re typically talking about some RF functionality being integrated into SOCs that are essentially digital processors. True, you can integrate RF functionality into an SOC built on planar bulk (it’s generally agreed to be a nightmare in bulk FinFETs, though). But you can integrate RF into your digital SOC much more easily, efficiently and with less power if you do it in FD-SOI.

RF/analog has a (well-deserved) rep of being the most challenging part of chip design. Analog/RF devices are super sensitive to voltage variations. The digital parts of a chip, which have strong, sudden signal switching, can raise havoc with nearby analog/RF blocks. This means that the analog/RF designers have to care acutely about gain, matching, variability, noise, power dissipation, and resistance. They use all kinds of specialized techniques: FD-SOI makes their job a lot easier (good explanation in slide 8 here). What’s more, FD-SOI’s analog performance far exceeds bulk.

What sort of chips are we talking about? For now, we’re talking about processors for mobile devices, for IoT, for automotive, for consumer electronics. When we say “RF in an FD-SOI SOC”, we’re currently talking about chips that are connecting over a relatively short distance to a nearby box or device (<100m for local WiFi, or a few meters for Bluetooth or Zigbee, for example).

ST’s new set-top-box processors on 28nm FD-SOI (read about them here) are a great example. They are the first on the market integrating 4×4 802.11ac Wi-Fi (using IP from Quantenna) and High Dynamic Range support. This means the set-top boxes can reliably serve lots of HD video via WiFi to multiple users throughout the house (hopefully ending the cry: “Who’s hogging all the Wifi?!?”). ST credits their 28nm FD-SOI silicon technology with providing that highly-efficient RF, state-of-the-art WiFi performance and robustness required for reliable video delivery inside the home.

For RF on FD-SOI – as in other FD-SOI apps – designers use SOI wafers with ultra-thin silicon, ultra-thin insulating BOX and phenomenal top silicon thickness uniformity. These wafers are not the special high-resistivity wafers used in RF-SOI. Rather, they are the latest generations of the same (amazing!) FD-SOI wafers that Soitec introduced in 2010. (For an excellent, in-depth interview with the Soitec FD-SOI wafer guru on the supply chain and the most recent developments, click here.)

TopSiLoss_FDSOI

The top silicon uniformity of Soitec’s “FD-2D” wafers for FD-SOI is guaranteed to within +/-5Å at all points on all wafers. 5 Å across a wafer is equivalent to 5 mm over 3,000 km, which corresponds to approximately 0.2 inches over the distance between Chicago and San Francisco. That uniformity is maintained not just across each wafer, but from one wafer to the next. The BOX thickness is 10nm to 25nm, depending on the customer’s approach.

This is the type of wafers that GloFo, ST, Samsung, Freescale, Sony, several other companies in Japan and many more around the world are using when they say they’re doing RF on FD-SOI. Bear in mind that this level of SOC integration is fairly new (Samsung and TSMC just announced RF integration into SOCs for the first time in 2014 on 28bulk). But using FD-SOI technology and the corresponding ultra-thin SOI wafer substrates makes life much easier for the RF folks on the design teams, gets far better performance and far lower power at a much more attractive cost.

Further ahead, FD-SOI is also a candidate for transceivers and baseband/modem SOCs, which require high-performance digital and analog/RF integration. But even with transceivers on FD-SOI, you’ll still need the FEM on RF-SOI to handle the interface.

So, that’s the current difference between RF-SOI and RF on FD-SOI.

Hope that helps to clear things up?

ByGianni PRATA

Shanghai FD-SOI and RF-SOI Presentations From Top CEO/CTO/VPs on SOI Consortium Website

A very successful two-day forum on FD-SOI and RF-SOI in Shanghai (September 2015) featured presentations from CEOs, CTOs and VPs at GF, ST, Leti, ARM, Verisilicon, Synapse Design, SITRI, Skyworks, Freescale, TowerJazz, Soitec, Qorvo and many more. Most of the presentations are now available on the SOI Consortium Website, and the rest are expected shortly, so keep checking back.

To download the “Design for FD-SOI” presentations, see the list here.

To download the “RF-SOI Workshop – Interconnected World” presentations, see the list here. (Presentations from all of the major SOI wafer suppliers are also available on this page.)

ByGianni PRATA

TowerJazz and TowerJazz Panasonic Semi Co sampling best-in-class sub-90fs Ron-Coff RF-SOI on 300mm wafers for Next-Gen 4G LTE and IoT Apps

TowerJazz-TPSCo-300mm-RF-SOIGlobal specialty foundry TowerJazz and TowerJazz Panasonic Semiconductor Co. (TPSCo), the leading analog foundry in Japan, have announced breakthrough RF-SOI technology for next-generation 4G LTE smartphones and IoT devices. Through a collaborative effort, TowerJazz and its majority owned subsidiary, TPSCo, have developed a new 300mm RF-SOI process that can reduce losses in an RF switch by as much as 30% relative to current technology, improving battery life and boosting data rates. The technology achieves a record Ron-Coff figure of merit of sub-90fs and is now being sampled to a lead customer. (Read the press release here.)

ByGianni PRATA

TowerJazz — Interview With SVP Marco Racanelli: What’s Driving Strong SOI-Based Design Wins?

Dr. Marco Racanelli, TowerJazz Senior Vice President & General Manager, RF & High Performance Analog Business Group and Aerospace & Defense Group

Dr. Marco Racanelli, TowerJazz Senior Vice President & General Manager, RF & High Performance Analog Business Group and Aerospace & Defense Group

 

 

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ASN recently spoke with TowerJazz SVP Marco Racanelli about when the specialty foundry leverages SOI – and why.

Advanced Substrate News (ASN): Can you tell us briefly about TowerJazz’s overall vision and position in the market? 

Marco Racanelli (MR):  TowerJazz is the foundry leader for the manufacture of specialty semiconductor devices.  By “specialty” semiconductor devices, we mean those that require technology with some degree of specialization beyond commodity CMOS, for example in applications such as analog, RF, power, CMOS Image Sensor, and MEMS.  We invest in specialty process technology and manufacturing capacity around the world to fuel our growth (today we have manufacturing facilities in the US, Israel and Japan).

The TowerJazz fab in Newport Beach, CA.

The TowerJazz fab in Newport Beach, CA.

ASN: What kinds of chips does TowerJazz propose customers put on SOI? Why? 

MR: SOI on high resistivity substrates provides excellent RF isolation for customers working on front-end modules (FEMs) for wireless communication products.  Specifically for RF switches, thin device silicon layers result in low junction capacitance which is favorable for achieving high isolation.  We have had some customers leverage our SiGe BiCMOS technologies on SOI to integrate improved RF switching capabilities and achieve better isolation among circuit blocks.  Finally, some TowerJazz customers use thick film SOI for MEMS.  The silicon layer in SOI is used to fabricate beams for electro-mechanical structures and devices, e.g. MEMS resonators.

ASN: What are the growth drivers (end-markets, trends) for your SOI-based services? 

MR: Each generation of smart phones has required increasing numbers of RF ports to support multiple standards and functions e.g. 3G, 4G, 802.11, diversity antenna.  The need for longer handset battery life is driving implementation of RF-SOI based antenna tuner products to improve antenna efficiency.

 

Click to enlarge. (Courtesy: Techinsights’ Teardown.com and IEEE S3S Conference)

Click image to enlarge. (Courtesy: Techinsights’ Teardown.com and IEEE S3S Conference)

ASN: What are the advantages in moving to SOI-based technologies? 

MR: In some markets such as FEMs, the performance advantages of SOI are required to enable these RF products in CMOS; bulk technologies simply can’t provide the required isolation and low capacitance to meet the most demanding 4G/LTE specifications.  Thicker film SOI can support SiGe bipolar devices with significantly lower collector-to-substrate capacitance than their bulk counterparts.  In high voltage products, SOI dielectric isolation can simplify the design process, reduce latch-up risk, and allow a much more compact design than junction-isolated technologies.

Inside the TowerJazz Newport Beach Facility (Fab 3)

Inside the TowerJazz Newport Beach Facility (Fab 3)

ASN: Are there particular regions where you see especially high growth for SOI-based offerings? 

MR: We see broad adoption of SOI in all major phone platforms.  Our strongest growth and largest market for SOI is in the US although we see some Asia customers as well. The end customers are more evenly distributed between the US and Asia primarily.

ASN: Last year, you announced your RF-SOI had the industry’s best figure of merit for antenna switch and antenna tuning applications. What are you seeing there in terms of design wins? 

MR: We are seeing very strong design wins and production ramp of SOI in our factories.

 

American Semiconductor's  FleX-MCU™ product family leverages an SOI starting wafer.  (Courtesy: American Semiconductor)

American Semiconductor’s FleX-MCU™ product family leverages an SOI starting wafer.
(Courtesy: American Semiconductor)

ASN: American Semi partnered with TowerJazz on flexible ICs, which leverage SOI.  What sort of applications is that technology going into?  

MR: The potential for flexible ICs is very broad. For Aerospace and Defense, key areas of interest are ‘wearable’ circuits, introducing ICs and systems into soldiers’ field clothes and gear, creating a radar system that conforms to the entire body of an aircraft, sea vehicle, or any UAV or drone.  The ideas can be countless – the path is to reduce or eliminate the rigid form and fit of mobile electronics and integrate these electronics into a lighter weight, smaller and more flexible material.

ASN: Cavendish Kinetics announced that they’d be collaborating with you on RF-MEMS for mobile, which could be on SOI.  Is that available, and if so, can you tell us about it?

MR: We continue to work with Cavendish and have announced impressive reliability results with their devices; these are available through Cavendish directly.

ASN: Can you tell us more about the forthcoming 0.18 TS18SOI integrated power platform? 

MR: This platform is targeting a number of applications, the dominant one being in automotive and will include high-voltage devices, 0.18um CMOS for integration of digital and power management functions along with non-volatile-memory.  SOI in this case helps isolate the devices from the substrate allowing flexibility in applying voltages without turning on junctions that can lead to leakage or latch-up and in some cases helps reduce die-size by improving isolation allowing devices to be closer together.

ASN: Looking down the road, where/how do SOI-based technologies fit into your outlook for the future?  

MR: SOI particularly for RF is a significant focus for TowerJazz and we continue to invest in new technology and propagating the technology we have to multiple factories to increase capacity available to our customers.  While RF dominates our SOI consumption, we also see a good future for SOI in power management and MEMS and other sensor applications.

 

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TowerJazz will be presenting its SOI and other processes at its upcoming Technical Global Symposiums (TGS) taking place in Europe (18 September 2014), the US (19 November 14) and Japan (10 December 2014). To find out more and register for TGS, please visit: http://www.towerjazz.com/tgs/

 

 

 

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Dr. Marco Racanelli has served as TowerJazz Senior Vice President & General Manager, RF & High Performance Analog Business Group and Aerospace & Defense Group since September 2008. Previously, he served as Vice President of Technology & Engineering, Aerospace & Defense General Manager for Jazz Semiconductor.

 Prior to Jazz, Dr. Racanelli held several positions at Conexant Systems and Rockwell Semiconductor since 1996 in the area of technology development where he helped establish industry leadership in SiGe and BiCMOS and MEMS technology, and built a strong design support organization. Prior to Rockwell, Dr. Racanelli worked at Motorola, Inc., where he contributed to bipolar, SiGe and SOI development for its Semiconductor Products Sector.

 Dr. Racanelli received a Ph.D. and a M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from Lehigh University. He holds over 35 U.S. patents.

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ByGianni PRATA

TowerJazz Releases Enhanced RF-SOI CMOS Process Design Kit for use with Agilent Technologies’ Advanced Design System Software

Specialty foundry TowerJazz announced the availability of an enhanced RF-SOI CMOS process design kit (PDK) for its 0.18µm process technology (see press release here). The kit was developed for use with Agilent Technologies’ Advanced Design System (ADS) software and targets a wide range of analog markets including front-end modules for mobile phones, tablets and WiFi terminals.